Interview with an Entrepreneur

Interview with an Entrepreneur

  Interview with Portland-based artist,  Monika Kralicek .

Interview with Portland-based artist, Monika Kralicek.

Will you share a bit of your personal and professional origin story?

 

I was kind of all over the place when I was younger. I'm 30 now, but 10 years ago I was moving every 10-12 months, couldn't stay in one place or at job for too long. I've always loved adventure and art, so those two things have been a part of my life since I can remember. But it wasn't till moving to Oregon that I found the value of planting roots and allowing room (and stability) for a creative passion to grow and mature. I started painting in the evenings while working a 8-5 job, I was really inspired to use the palette knife and that little tool totally changed my work, fields of texture were opened up to me and returning to the canvas is still a very exciting prospect. Since 2016 I've been refining my voice and color palette, exploring new methods and ideas, and I feel very young as far as my artwork goes. I want to keep exploring and maturing, and as far as the business side of things go? I'm figuring it out everyday, one moment at a time!

 

How do you make sure you are showing up in your business and aligning with your values?

 

I find that pretty easy since my business is 'myself' and I'm still quite small. Although I haven't always been the most carefully calculated and cautious individual the idea that I'm building a professional name for myself and everything I share as far as the development and progression of my work and the choices I make when forming partnerships and selling, it's out in the open... all the time... it makes me move a little more slowly and mindfully. I look at this like a long term endeavor. I don't need to make a quick buck now, I want my work and career as an artist to last, so I keep that in mind always.

 

How do you approach time management and harmony between your business and life?

 

The perfect balance will never exist, and I've found that there are true seasons of 'busy'. So I try to take things one day at time. I focus on deadlines first and sometimes that means I have to cancel plans and work a little harder (or get a little less sleep). Other times, although I may prefer to be painting, I make it priority to spend the time with friends or family. Relationships are such a privilege and I never want to take that for granted. 

 

How has being a woman informed your work?

 

In my opinion being a woman has had a larger impact on my business than it has my art. There is an incredible community of female artists and makers and rather than foster a spirit of competition this community builds up and champions one another. I freakin love that! There has been so much I've struggled to figure out as far as the business side of selling art goes, and rather than go to google, I know I can go to these communities of women and find the answers quickly, it's an amazing thing!

 

If you could give your younger self one piece of advice, what would it be?

 

I would tell myself to stick it out through the hard parts and that done is better than perfect. I've gotten so sidetracked and discouraged because I'd obsess over details that were beyond my ability. I'd want to figure everything out, do everything perfectly, and inevitably I'd hit a roadblock or super monotonous/time consuming hurdle and just give up and move onto something else. This is harder when you're younger, especially if you deal with a lack of focus, so I don't dwell on the regret of missed opportunities, but I know I would be further than where I'm at right now if I had just stuck with things.

Gratitude Goes Both Ways

Gratitude Goes Both Ways

The Importance of Spending Time Alone

The Importance of Spending Time Alone